Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Brachiosaurus Death Scene

Recently I took my mother and my girlfriend to see ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.’ I was prepared for a relaxed evening of eating nachos and popcorn at the theater.

Spoiler Alert

I wasn’t prepared, however, for what I would consider one of the saddest scenes that I’ve ever witnessed in a movie.

The scene where, as volcanoes were erupting, the crews were escaping the island and the brachiosaurus was left standing on the dock watching the boats sail off as it awaited its certain death.

Now, there are many dinosaurs who die throughout the Jurassic Park franchise, so what was different about this scene? Why did this scene in particular conjure such an emotional reaction from the audience?

It’s a CGI dinosaur, so why would anyone in their right mind be upset about CGI flames engulfing her? It’s not real, after all.

The reason this scene is particularly devastating is because of its powerful imagery; what it represents.

The original ‘Jurassic Park’ was released in 1993. The first animated dinosaur that we see in Jurassic Park is the brachiosaurus. The scene, in the original, marks a turning point in the evolution of science and engineering; the recreation of ancient dinosaurs.

With that revelation, was a dream to build an amusement park like no other.

25 years later, that dream is gone. The brachiosaurus pier scene in ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom’ is a representation of the dream dying. The scene conveys this representation with a nostalgic symmetry.

The brachiosaurus is used to represent both the birth and death of the dream.

What’s more, for me anyhow, is the timing. I was 10 years old when the original Jurassic Park was released. I was enthralled by the pageantry and allure of this film as a child. It was a remarkably huge film that captured the imagination of the young and old alike.

In a way, the symbolism of the brachiosaurus being left behind to die on that island was a representation, too, of the death of youth. Youth, like that island, you can never go back to.

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